Crawford Lab members attend the 2018 Nobel Prize Ceremony

Dr. Jamie Scott and Dr. Felix Breden attended the 2018 Nobel Prize ceremony in Stockholm, Sweden to celebrate Jamie’s PhD supervisor, George P. Smith. Dr. Smith was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his pioneering work on the phage display of peptides and antibodies. Dr. Jamie Scott was the first author on the seminal paper on this work; check out “Scott, J. K., & Smith, G. P. (1990). Searching for peptide ligands with an epitope library. Science, 249(4967), 386-390.”

From the photos, it looks like everyone had a great time! Check out Felix in his penguin suit and Jamie looking radiant in a beautiful Armani dress.

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What strange things can you find in the shorelines of Canada?

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The use of interactive maps made by Alannah Biega (@alannahbiega, an alumni of the Crawford Lab) is  highlighting the top items collected from Canadian shores (https://arcg.is/1ee0ib) while also showing odd items (https://arcg.is/m1TDr). Helping your closest shoreline clean up group could lead you to finding an unopened bottle of champagne, a rubber chicken, or even money!

The Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup Interactive Map

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The information of these maps were used for the following news articles:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/tiny-trash-plastic-shorelines-cleanup-1.4548249

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/pei-rope-found-on-island-shoreline-1.4547408

Study finds greater risk of extinction among high diversity amphibian groups

By the Simon Fraser University Biology Department

SFU’s Issues and Experts and SFU News have featured a recent study by Dan Greenberg and Arne Mooers.

From the reports: “A new study by Simon Fraser University biologists Dan Greenberg and Arne Mooers offers clues to why more than 30 per cent of amphibians, including frogs, newts, toads and salamanders, are at risk of extinction.

The researchers examined evolutionary patterns of modern extinction risk across more than 300 amphibian groups and found that species from groups with high ongoing diversification are at greater risk of extinction than slowly diversifying lineages. The research is published this month in the journal Evolution Letters.”

Click on the links below for more information and a link to the article:

http://www.sfu.ca/university-communications/issues-experts/2017/study-finds-greater-risk-of-extinction-among-high-diversity-amph.html

http://www.sfu.ca/science/news-events/news/2017/study-finds-greater-risk-of-extinction-among-high-diversity-amphibian-groups.html

How and why are humans like social insects?

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The Faculty of Science Research News page has posted a summary of a recent paper by Bernie Crespi, “How and why are humans like social insects?” published in Behavioural and Brain Sciences.

Read the summary on the Research News page (includes link to paper): http://www.sfu.ca/science/research/research-news/2017-02-09-Crespi.html

Article from http://www.sfu.ca/biology/kudos-news/news/2017-crespi-fos.html

Choosey female guppies select for more colourful males with bigger Y chromosomes

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The Faculty of Science Research News page has posted a summary of a recent paper by Felix Breden and colleagues, “Choosey female guppies select for more colourful males with bigger Y chromosomes” published in Nature Communications.

Read the summary on the Research News page (includes link to paper):
http://www.sfu.ca/science/research/research-news/2017-02-27-Breden.html

Article from: http://www.sfu.ca/biology/kudos-news/news/2017-breden-fos.html

Global representation of threatened amphibians ex situ is bolstered by non-traditional institutions, but gaps remain

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Photo: Jonathan Kolby

A study led by graduate students Alannah Biega and Dan Greenberg with post doctoral researcher Tom Martin, from the Arne Mooers lab, is the feature article in this month’s (April 2017) edition of Animal Conservation. They consider how well Zoos are doing at representing frogs and salamanders of conservation concern in their collections. As the “feature” article, the paper graces the cover, and there are three scholarly commentaries and a response discussing the role of zoos in mitigating global amphibian declines.

You can read it all here:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/acv.2017.20.issue-2/issuetoc

Article from: http://www.sfu.ca/biology/kudos-news/news/2017-mooers-AnimalConservation.html